All Words > Apodictic

Friday, January 21

Apodictic

[ap-ə-DIK-tik]

Part of speech: adjective

Origin: Latin, mid 17th century

1.

Clearly established or beyond dispute.

Examples of Apodictic in a sentence

"The surgeon had an apodictic knowledge of the human body."

"I can claim apodictic abilities once I receive my certification in electrical engineering."

Popularity Over Time

Popularity over time graph

About Apodictic

This word comes from the Latin “apodicticus,” originally from the Greek “apodeiktikos” and “apodeiktos.” It stems from the verbal adjective of “apodeiknynai,” meaning "to show off, demonstrate, show by argument, point out, prove."

Did you Know?

Theologians discuss two kinds of law: apodictic and casuistic. Apodictic law is comprised of absolute commands often rendered from a higher power, like the Ten Commandments. Casuistic law (also known as case law) is based on precedents and moral principles are applied to determine right and wrong in specific situations.

Trending Words
Trending on the blog

What's the word?