All Words > Erudite

Friday, September 27

Erudite

[er-ə-dīt]

Part of speech: adjective

Origin: Middle English, 14th century

1.

Possessing knowledge as a result of study

2.

Learned

Examples of Erudite in a sentence

"You can go a long way in life if you can study hard and become an erudite student."

"She developed a reputation as an erudite scholar who was passionate about her field of study."

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About Erudite

Michael Nicholson of Kalamazoo, Michigan, might be the world's most erudite person, or most scholarly, dedicated pupil. Over the course of his lifetime, he's accumulated 30 college degrees (including a doctorate and three masters), most of them in the field of education.

Did you Know?

The origins of erudite literally describe someone who is not rude. If that seems off-topic, stay with us: The word rude once described someone who was unrefined and unlearned, and the prefix e- can be translated as "out of." Thus, to become erudite is to leave a rough state for a higher plane of educated sophistication.

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