All Words > Inchoate

Saturday, September 28

Inchoate

[in-koh-ət]

Part of speech: adjective

Origin: Latin, 16th century

1.

Recently begun and thus not fully formed

2.

Incomplete or rudimentary

3.

Disorderly or incoherent

Examples of Inchoate in a sentence

"Our inchoate organization still needed to fill major positions."

"The team was somewhat inchoate, lacking the leadership and skills to get the job done."

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About Inchoate

Many businesses operate from inchoate, or not fully formed, plans and suffer as a result. For example, the search engine Excite had an opportunity to purchase Google in 1999 for the price of $750,000, but the plan fell through. Google is now worth $101.8 billion.

Did you Know?

Inchoate evolved in meaning and connotation over time. Because it derives from a Latin word meaning "to work on," it generally refers to something that's in progress but unfinished. However, over time it's developed a slightly negative connotation that suggests disarray or confusion.

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