All Words > Lugubrious

Sunday, December 29

Lugubrious

[loo-GOO-bree-əs]

Part of speech: adjective

Origin: Latin, 16th century

1.

Sad or gloomy

2.

Exaggeratedly mournful

Examples of Lugubrious in a sentence

"The recent loss of their aunt cast a lugubrious shadow over the family gathering."

"Her lugubrious attitude seemed more about getting attention than mourning any loss."

Popularity Over Time

Popularity over time graph

About Lugubrious

The quintessential demonstration of lugubrious is the character Eeyore from “Winnie the Pooh.” This eternally sad donkey moans about and expects the worst of everything, but his friends still love him.

Did you Know?

"Lugubrious" can be traced back to the Latin verb “lugēre,” which means to mourn. The Latin adjective is “lugubris,” which translates neatly to the English word you see before you. It’s an appropriately dramatic word for someone demonstrating over-the-top sadness.

Trending Words
Trending on the blog

What's the word?