All Words > Mendacious

Thursday, September 5

Mendacious

[men-dey-shəs]

Part of speech: adjective

Origin: Latin, early 17th century

1.

Frequently dishonest or deceitful

2.

Untrue

Examples of Mendacious in a sentence

"If you weren't so mendacious, I would be more inclined to believe your story."

"Her mendacious words were delivered with conviction, but there was no truth behind any of it."

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About Mendacious

One of the most famous habitual liars — or one of the most mendacious figures — in literature is The Boy Who Cried Wolf. In the iconic fable, a young boy regularly lies about a wolf attacking his sheep. When a wolf actually does attack his sheep, the townspeople don’t believe him.

Did you Know?

Mendacious shares the same roots as amend, connected by their meaning relating to adapting or changing something that's been said. In the case of mendacious, it's changed into a falsehood.

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