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Tuesday, April 21

Rhapsody

[RAP-sə-dee]

Part of speech: noun

Origin: Greek, mid-16th century

1.

An effusively enthusiastic or ecstatic expression of feeling.

2.

A free instrumental composition in one extended movement, typically one that is emotional or exuberant in character.

Examples of Rhapsody in a sentence

"The story captured the rhapsody of first love and all the emotion that goes along with it. "

"He wrote a rhapsody inspired by the colors of the blooming spring garden."

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About Rhapsody

As a song, a rhapsody is exuberant and bold, full of feeling. It’s written as one instrumental composition. But you can also apply rhapsody outside of the music world. You might recognize “rhapsodies of praise” or a “rhapsody of spring.” Any expression of intense emotions and enthusiasm can be a rhapsody.

Did you Know?

In Ancient Greece, a rhapsody was an epic poem, usually recited in one sitting. Over the years, a rhapsody became a song instead of a poem, but still exuberant and often quite long. You can find rhapsodies all throughout the history of classical music and even in more modern forms, like Queen’s epic “Bohemian Rhapsody.”

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